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Plagiarism

Plagiarism is a type of cheating that involves the use of another person's ideas or work as one's own, in whole or in part, without acknowledging the author or obtaining his or her permission. Plagiarism is not limited to written text, but also applies to other works, such as ideas, designs, art, music, etc. Students can plagiarize in a number of ways, as explained below:

Direct Plagiarism

Copying another writer's work directly with no attempt to acknowledge the source where the material was found. Example of direct plagiarism ›

FYI

Plagiarism is not limited to written text, but also applies to other works, such as ideas, designs, art, music, etc.

Direct "Patchwork" Plagiarism

Copying and rearranging material from several writers with no attempt to acknowledge the original sources. Example of direct "patchwork" plagiarism ›

Insufficient Citation of Partial Quotations

Using partial sentences, words, or phrases that are stylistically or intellectually marked as another writer's without quotation marks within a larger paraphrase of the source, with or without attempt at citation. Example of insufficient citation of partial quotation ›

Paraphrasing (or Summarizing) without Citing

Changing the words of an original source, but using the ideas in it without acknowledging that those ideas are not the student’s original thought, even if the student adds his or her own spin to the original. Example of paraphrasing without citing ›

Insufficient Citation of Paraphrase (or Summary)

Changing the words of an original source and using the author's ideas with attempts to acknowledge the material's source(s), but without correct or adequate citation. Example of insufficient citation of paraphrase (or summary) ›

Plagiarism of Graphs, Charts, Figures, or Images

Using graphs, charts, figures, or images from a source without acknowledging that another person developed them. Example of plagiarism of graphics, charts, figures, or images ›

Misinterpretation of Material as "Common Knowledge"

Failing to provide citation for material because the student believes it is "common knowledge," when it is not. Example of misrepresentation of material as "common knowledge" ›

Self-Plagiarism

Submitting a substantial portion of one’s own previous work or ideas to meet requirements in different contexts, when it is prohibited.